On how design can improve our personality

It’s generally accepted that a good design especially for home interiors can improve our fleeting moods and even though we might not be able to explain why a certain style or object influences our spirit, we cannot deny it’s importance in our lives. But from changing a mood to making us better people – how is that possible?

Well, we start from the general acceptance that our personalities are shaped by the environments we grew up in, the emotions we feel, the relationships we build and value, the things we do or do not like. And it’s also generally accepted that just as fashion and lifestyle choices speak about who we are, so does the design we choose for the places we call ‘home’. There is no ‘good’ or ‘bad’ design, there is no space identical with another just as we are all unique in our sense of self. But there is one thing we all hold in common and hope to achieve through the space we create around us: the need for balance.

No matter the conditions of our upbringing and current lives we all feel a lack on the inside that we hope to compensate with the things we are attracted to. Let’s think about how we love to re-create the raw, undisturbed feeling of nature in a 50m² apartment in a busy city. Some crave the cosy shabby space of their grandparents homes when over exposed to this fast paced modern life; others, though belonging to the Western cultures decorate with Buddha statues and Asian zen inspiration.

Although not always taken into consideration, the choices we make when deciding how our home will look affect our subconscious and can deepen that need of compensation or bring us closer to the serenity of living. In the following articles we’ll be going through some of the most important interior design styles and see how they can become our ‘therapists’.

1. Scandinavian style

 

source - Pinterest

source – Pinterest

source - Vogue Living Australia

source – Vogue Living Australia

source - Pinterest

source – Pinterest

source - Designist.ro

source – Designist.ro

source - Designist.ro

source – Designist.ro

With it’s minimalist colors and few decorations, the Scandinavian interior design style focuses on function and comfort rather than aesthetics. It’s highly fashionable today adopted by most interiors in cafes, restaurants and even hotels. With its washed out colors and rugged furniture it’s dedicated for those who want to escape the modern, high tech world and go to a peaceful and unpretentious place.

How can it help us become better people? By shifting the focus more on utility and comfort and less on the poised, free of imperfections look we become more indulgent with ourselves. We start noticing what really matters and less what it should look like. We create a space where we can experiment with textures, creating objects with different purpose, throw a blanket or a fur, not worrying about too many colors to mix and match. Natural fabrics, unpretentious furniture and light shades – the Scandinavian design style teaches us how to be gentle with ourselves.

2. Minimalism

 

source - Igloo Media

source – Igloo Media

source - Designist.ro

source – Designist.ro

source - Designist.ro

source – Designist.ro

source - Pinterest

source – Pinterest

source - Fresh Home

source – Fresh Home

source - Pinterest

source – Pinterest

modern-minimalist-design-awesome-ideas-on-modern-ideas-1Unlike the gentle Scandinavian, minimalism shows a great attention towards details, perfectly balanced aesthetics and quality of materials. It’s a sign of a person excruciatingly trying to bring order to an otherwise cluttered, agitated mind. It’s a style that describes perfectionism, high expectations, desire to make it all look and fit perfectly. This comes with a great price for the peace of mind so a minimalist space might be just what the doctor ordered: coming home to an environment that breathes peace, soothing lines, no piles of misplaces objects is like meditation for a busy mind.

Blueprinting out the right angles, shapes, lighting requires wisdom and great concentration. Resisting the temptation to add a few more decorations, a couple more colors and sticking to only what necessary requires great discipline.

‘Less is more’, said Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. Minimalism reminds us that the fullness sometimes resides in simpleness and just a few, but efficient and well designed objects.

(to be continued…)